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The Saga Continues

 

     This week has been very interesting. It was our first doing clinicals individually, and I elected to go to the breast cancer ward. Since I work on the oncology floor back in the United States, I thought it would be interesting to see how one works in China. When we got the list of choices, it just said that oncology was one, so I initially picked it. Come to find out, there are actually three wards including medical oncology, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer. The first one does not tend to have surgical patients, but the second two primarily only have surgical ones. In the coming weeks, I will visit the other two wards.

Traveling through China

 

It has been another busy two weeks! The nurses from one of the units in the hospital invited the group to a dumpling dinner. We had a great time sharing food and singing songs. It is great to see the camaraderie of a unit and to experience their generosity and kindness. As I have toured the hospital, I have noticed the respect the nurses give to their authorities. They truly appreciate their managers and charge nurses and are happy to be serving their patients. This week I have had opportunity of working with a nurse in the neurosurgery ward. The nurses gave me a tour of their unit and we spent a lot of time discussing the differences between nursing in the United States and China. I was honored when one of the neurosurgery doctors from another campus came to the hospital to meet me. He asked me questions about my experiences and was genuinely interested in my opinions of post-surgical practices.

Why is she singing in the shower? 5 tips for traveling introverts

 

 

The idea for this blog post came to me as I was quietly showering earlier this week, minding my own business. As it is a public shower room, another student entered the cubical next to me and proceeded to unleash her inner Hannah Montana. As her voice bounced and echoed across the tile ceiling, I was literally frozen in shock thinking to myself “we are literally separated by two feet of steamed air and an inch of plastic stall door and you’re belting ‘My Heart Will Go On…’ I AM RIGHT HERE!” In that moment I recognized the need to address how fellow introverts should mentally prepare for social interactions overseas.

 

1. Remember not everyone is an introvert (exhibit A presented above)

 

This is an obvious one. It’s cliché, but you’ve got to learn to go with the flow. Realize that not everyone is going to understand your bubble, your need for “recharging” time, or why you’re perfectly fine wandering around a museum by yourself for hours and showering in silence. Be even more flexible and courteous than you are in your normal life – traveling is stressful on all types of people. While the “duck-and-cover!” approach may work on your home campus when a definite extrovert has you in their sights, it doesn’t work that way while traveling (trust me, been there, it just gets awkward). People, all people, are your friends and you’re going to need to rely on them at some point. Like mama always said: it takes all kinds of kinds.

 

2. However, the world was not designed completely by extroverts!

 

Introverts unite! Bookshops, pubs, tea rooms, museums, and art galleries are the introvert’s havens and they are all over the place. People plan entire trips around gazing at Renaissance art, appreciating a distant, understood companionship with other introverts. There’s a beautiful, quiet world out there. Always keep in mind that your travel experience is about you. Want to sip tea and browse shelves of hardback books all day? You can! Want to spend six hours hiking with your headphones in? You can! Do what you want to do when you want to do it.

 

3. People watching is an acceptable hobby

 

When I first started people watching I was super paranoid that someone was going to be offended that I was looking at them. I averted my eyes, pretended to be reading billboards, ate three ice cream cones in one sitting to act like I wasn’t staring. Reality check: No one is actually paying attention to you paying attention to them. It’s literally like bird watching. Strangers milling about in the town square have places to be and things to do. Since you don’t, sit back, relax and observe.

 

4. Public transportation is your friend

 

Feeling alone in your introversion? Fear not! The tube, the subway, railcars, public buses, taxis, (although strangely enough not airplanes) are designated places of sanctuary for introverts. A ticket for any form of public transportation is like an unspoken invitation to the introvert convention. Don’t talk, it’s weird.

 

5. Personal space doesn’t exist in some countries, however it does in England!

 

            They understand the bubble.

 

Harlaxton Trip Planning: With the School or Solo?

 
LlanfairFor a lot of UE students, planning for Harlaxton is an exciting and stressful process. Budgets, plane tickets, packing, it all gets a little overwhelming especially as the semester workload at home is picking up. Luckily, for all you UE students interested in the Harlaxton experience there are approximately 150 voices on this side of the pond who love to share their advice. In Skyping friends on campus from my manor house (they insist we call it that, I still prefer “castle”) at Harlaxton, I’m finding that the question that comes up most is “Which school trips should we go on?” The short answer to that question is you have to do what works for you, however I’m going to use this blog to give you future Harlaxton Lions a few pros and cons to traveling with the school.

 

The Diverse and the Curious

 

After a missed flight, no sleep, finally finishing my homework, and a 14-hour flight, I have FINALLY made it to China!  What an experience it was.  Travelling is all about being flexible and learning how to handle things as they come.  After all, how fun would an adventure be without a few misadventures to get your adrenaline going!?

Ireland Smells Like Dolphins

 
It is still amazing to me how many landscapes are crammed into this tiny island called the United Kingdom. Within these last two weeks I’ve seen so much of what the UK has to offer from haunted cobblestone alleys running underground in Scotland to the high tips of the Cliffs of Moher in Ireland. Everything still looks, sounds, and feels like a fairytale and I don’t think that’s a part of this experience that I want to stop. I love being engrossed, being wonderstruck. For me, scented memories get me wonderstruck. I realize this sounds completely crazy, but bear with me. With so many amazing things to look at while traveling I find sometimes that my eyes can’t sufficiently take everything in so my new tool for getting the most out of my Harlaxton experience is to close my eyes and smell.

I’ve compiled a short list of smells that I now associate with places and memories. If you get the chance to travel to these places someday you’ll have to tell me if you think I’m right or completely crazy :)

Anticipating China

 

After months of waiting, the week I leave for China has finally arrived! As I anticipate leaving for Hangzhou, China, I cannot stop thinking about all of the exciting opportunities ahead. Over the past few weeks, all of the details of the trip have fallen into place. I have been working on learning important phrases in Mandarin, as well as the dos and don’ts of society. I have researched Hangzhou to learn about the various attractions and activities of the city. I have also researched the 2nd Affiliated Hospital, where I will have the opportunity to learn about Chinese nursing. I am excited to observe how the Chinese nursing differs from nursing in the United States.

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Back to my Big City

 
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London was a homecoming for me, metaphorically speaking. I haven’t ever actually lived in London, but after a year and summer in Evansville I was craving a big city atmosphere again and sunk easily into the waves and energy of the metropolis. While expressing this to my friends back home they asked why I was still excited to return to UE in the spring if it felt so small. My answer was quick: UE is a small campus, but its opportunities are huge. I’m writing this blog in ENGLAND. I’ve just returned from the Harlaxton weekend trip to London – a city mashup of history and modernism in its architecture and its people - so few people get to do this. While I’m still exploring this side of the pond, I can just say that I’m thankful for a university that realized they needed to send me out to find my place and my education.

The Jezreel Expedition Experience

 
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Not all archaeological excavations are created equal. As a PhD candidate specializing in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of California-Berkeley, I can tell you that, mostly, the dirt is the dirt is the dirt. All over the world the earth yields beautiful, wonderful, exciting, mundane artifacts - jewelry, figurines, sickle blades, broken pieces of pottery, you name it. And those artifacts tell all sort of stories about the people who made those fabulous and ordinary and marvelous things, stories that are both familiar and surprising, stories that link us to them and show how different we all are, yet how much we are also the same.

Why Come to Tel Jezreel?

 
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The team at Jezreel includes several volunteers in our 50s and above who have no obvious staff or academic role. We are here as amateurs in the original sense – we study archaeology for love.

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